Window on Canada
 
 

 

Canadian Ethnic Journalists' and Writers' Club:
26th Annual Awards Gala Resounding Success

The Annual Awards Gala held on June 25 to celebrate the Club's 26th annual awards was attended by a capacity crowd which greeted the eight winners with enthusiasm and applauded.

In welcoming guests, club president Ben Viccari, President of Canadian Ethnic Journalists' and Writers' Club,  recounted the events since the last year's gala.

Jean Augustine, Secretary of State for Multiculturalism and the Status of Women, congratulated the winners and commended the club. Gerry Phillip, Ontario Management Board Chair, congratulated the winners of this year's awards. He also read out a congratulatory message from Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty. Deputy Mayor Joe Pantalone represented Toronto at the gala. Consul General of the Republic of Macedonia Stefan Nikolovski was also present.


Minister Jean Augustine with Suresh Jaura and Jay Chauhan

                                Photo: Anusha (Globalom Media)

The (Club's) founder's daughter, Madeline Ziniak,  executive director of CEJWC  who is vice president and station manager of Omni Television, in her address explained: "My father's aim was to have an association that mirrored a society that had become multicultural; an inclusive association and not just a lobbying group. We expose our members to key speakers at our regular meetings. We encourage attendance by guests from the 'mainstream'  and in this way spread the word that there's a whole media world out there. Our objective is to champion the idea of multi-ethnic media: as a means of providing comfort and assistance to the newcomer; as a means of helping members of ethnocultural groups realize the part they play in Canadian society as a whole; and as a means of helping us preserve our respective heritages. This is an idea important to Canada as a whole, a vital pillar of nation building."

Sierhey Khmara Ziniak, Byelorussian  journalist and poet who had fought both  Soviet and Nazi occupiers with his pen had come to Canada after the Second World War and founded, edited and published  a monthly newspaper, Byelorussian Voice, for Canada's relatively small Byelorussian (presently Belarus community). 

He came at a time when ethnic print media, although established in Canada for more than a century and a half, were beginning to proliferate rapidly. In the 1960s, an association had been formed but represented only publishers of print media and excluded editors, reporters, freelance writers and workers in the expanding ethnic radio field. He strongly felt the ethnic journalism community needed an inclusive association of journalists and writers. 

In 1978, multilingual television was just around the corner with several companies vying for the first Toronto station. That's the year Ziniak gathered together a group of ethnic journalists and formed The Canadian Ethnic Journalists' and Writers' Club and initiated its annual awards program.

"We emphasize the fact that the CEJWC Awards are juried," says Ben Viccari, president. "Other organizations may choose to flatter politicians or anoint long standing members by conferring awards, but ours are designed to celebrate journalistic excellence since we act in the belief that ethnic media are a legitimate force in our society."

Each year, the club gives juried awards of excellence for entries from print, radio and television journalists plus an award for the year's best contribution to the idea of multiculturalism through journalism. This latter award is named for Sierhey Khmara Ziniak (1905-1992) CEJWC 's founder. Internet was included, for the first time in the Club's history, as a category for this year's awards.

The special stage presentation at the Velma Graham Rogers Theatre included a bevy of professional entertainers ranging from magicians to improv comedians to singers in Polish and Portuguese: Jeng Yi, Korean percussion drums; Caterina Cardeal, Porgutuese songs; Bryan Abichndani, magic; Ryan Joyce, illusionist; Carolina Ingleton, Polish singer; Adolfo B, hypnotist and The Improv Comedy Trio.

From the dramatic opening to the drumbeats of the Korean drummers to the final romantic notes of the evening's last song carried the trademark of professionalism that has characterized OMNI productions since the system began broadcasting 22 months ago.

Presentation of the awards was interspersed with performances by ethnic entertainers. It was followed by a reception during which Minister Jean Augustine presented award winners with a specially prepared personalised congratulatory message. 

The show was produced by Rick Davis, producer/director of RWD Productions for Omni Television. The show hosts were OMNI's Lucy Zilio and Greek comedian Angelo Tsarouchas.

The entire awards show will be televised as follows:

July 10th, 7:00 - 9:00 pm  -- OMNI.2 (cable 14)
July 17th, 8:00 - 10:00 pm -- OMNI.1 (cable 4)

 

This year's award winners are:

Print

Ashoke Dasgupta,
writer, for Home Away from Home in The Winnipeg Free Press, detailing the efforts of ethnocultural communities to attract immigrants to Winnipeg

Raissa Galechko, publisher/editor of the Ukranian-language magazine Vsesmih (Laughter) for her incisive cartoon - illustrated political satire series.

Radio

Zelda Young,
producer/host Shalom, CHIN Radio, for her informative interview program backgrounding the TV miniseries Hitler: The Rise of Evil.

Television

Sadia Zaman
, executive producer Vision TV, for Oratorio, a moving documentary of a Canadian musical tribute to inmates of Terezin concentration camp.

Greg Taylor, reporter, APTN National News and Current Affairs for contributing to an understanding of Canada's Métis people with the series Who is Métis?

Internet

Suresh Jaura,
publisher of the e-magazine South Asian Outlook for his article explaining his role in the ethnic media spectrum.

Jay Chauhan, columnist South Asian Outlook for his series Window on Canada: Legal Opinion offering his views in question and and answer format.

The Sierhey Khmara Ziniak Award

Jean La Rose,
CEO, Aboriginal People's Television Network for developing a vital service for Canada's Aboriginal peoples and providing a much-needed source of information and understanding for all Canadians.

Speech by Mr Ben Viccari, President, CEJWC

 

 

Minister of State the Honourable Jean Augustine Management Board of Ontario Chair the Honourable Gerry Phillips Mr Deputy Mayor Joe Pantalone, Consul General of the Republic of Macedonia Stefan Nikolovski, distinguished award winners, ladies and gentlemen Welcome! Bienvenue!

We look back with pride and affection 26 years to the beginnings of this Club Sierhey Khmara Ziniak who founded it because an existing association excluded all but newspaper publishers, had that same idea of inclusiveness that has become an essential element of our society.

We are editors, we are writers, we are directors, we are producers, we are essayists and we are poets. And publishers, too because we are democratic and therefore inclusive. And I might add, in the absence from the scene of that other group we are the oldest surviving association of our kind in Canada.

A lot of good things have happened since our last gala. We have new members from places as far apart as Russia, Bangladesh, Catalonia and South America. Tonight at our reception you’ll see a display of sample copies of our second anthology of members’ writing: Mosaic in Media hot off the press. We now have representation in the Canadian National Exhibition Association. This year we are media sponsors of the spectacular RCMP Musical Ride which will run from September third to Labour Day.

We intend to target more large organizations and institutions for inclusiveness at their press conferences and announcements. When political figures seek to address our membership at our monthlhy meetings, why can’t captains of industry and all those delightful socialites who preside over the affairs of arts organizations see where their future audiences and shareholders will come from?

We are at the centre of a period of celebration. Last Monday, Aboriginal Day, yesterday Saint Jean Baptiste Day and on Sunday, June 27th Multiculturalism Day. That day, which typifies the new Canada we interpret and help build --will this year fall on the eve of the federal election.

What we as communicators must never forget is that the responsibility of upholding a Multicultural society falls on our shoulders. There are still those who reject the idea of official Multiculturalism in spite of the fact that this country is the envy of the world. We as representatives of our communities must continue to demonstrate how living together in understanding and respect of each other is far, far better than mere tolerance, far, far more healthy than inter-ethnic hostility. And we must demand this of our society and our future governments.

Less than a week from now, we shall celebrate Canada Day. Let it bring us renewed determination to stand together in the words of the man who gave us Multiculturalism, Pierre Elliott Trudeau "as Canadians who continue to cherish, not concepts of uniformity but human values of compassion, love and understanding.”

Thank you and enjoy this evening’s celebrations.

 

[Canadian Ethnic Journalists' and Writers' Club]

 

The award winners are:

 

Ashoke Dasgupta, writer, for Home Away from Home in The Winnipeg Free Press, detailing the efforts of ethnocultural communities to attract immigrants to Winnipeg.

 

A Canadian citizen, born in India. Won UNDP-Goethe Institute Award for Environmental Journalism in Nepal 1995; was Copy Editor, 'The Independent,' Kathmandu, Nepal; Senior Editor, Pilgrims Book House, Kathmandu, before immigration to Canada 1997. Freelance writer in Canada; was Honourary Public Relations Officer, Himalaya Rescue Dog Squad.Graduated high school from La Martiniere College, Calcutta 1966; BA [Honours in English Literature], St. Xavier's College Calcutta; MBA [General Management] Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. Over four years in Winnipeg call centres including tele-sales, -customer service and -research. Currently Night Auditor with Howard Johnson Express Inns. 

 

An occasional contributor to the Winnipeg press; was a stringer for Toronto's 'Metro.' Volunteer experience includes: Writer for the Manitoba Customer Contact Association [MCCA]; Tour Guide, Winnipeg Humane Society; Member, Assiniboia District Library Advisory Committee; Trustee, Winnipeg Public Library. Member, Canadian Association of Journalists and Winnipeg Press Club. Life Member, Friends Of Dogs, Calcutta; Hony. Animal Welfare Officer, Ministry Of Environment and Forests, Government Of India; trained by the RSPCA, UK, as an Animal Welfare Trainer. Member, Winnipeg Humane Society.

 

 

Raissa Galechko, publisher/editor of the Ukranian-language magazine Vsesmih (Laughter) - a magazine of humour and satire.for her incisive cartoon - illustrated political satire series.

Coming to Canada in January 1989,  Raissa had to create a new existence for her then 14-year old daughter, Zoya, and herself, and "we had to adapt to  the new  society.  As a person from behind 'the iron curtain', speaking no English, having a little information about Western world, I had no idea what my life is going to be in my new country," says Raissa.

There were many Ukrainian newspapers and magazines in Canada as well as in USA, but not a single humorous publication.

"I started Vsesmikh/Laughter in August, 1991, to mark the noticeable date in Ukrainian history when Referendum in Ukraine voted over 90% for  Ukrainian independence from Soviet Union. This only magazine of humor and satire in entire  Ukrainian Diaspora. I started it with two Canadian Ukrainian artist cartoonists: Torontonian Ukrainian retired engineer Vsevolod Magas and professional artist from Windsor, Ontario, Ivan Jaciw. Since that this 'trio' is still working together in harmony," she adds.

 

Raissa has over 30 years experience in journalism, working for "serious" media. Half of this time she  worked in mail media in Kiev, capital of Ukraine, former state of Soviet Union. She was first in Ukraine to start an  "Ann Landers" type column, advising Soviet block readers on love, family, job, success, and social and personal problems.

"The genre as satire was not welcomed and much developed in former Soviet Union, in fact it was forbidden and punishable.

 

"Humor and especially satire are very delicate subject. You must balance between 'allowed and forbidden', 'legal and illegal' and 'acceptable and unethical' ", reminiscences Raissa.

Vsesmikh-Laughter was the first in Ukrainian publications to publish cartoons and caricatures of politicians, presidents and other notables. Vsesmikh/Laughter is an independent publication, made by one person, Raissa Galechko, with help of many contributors - writers and artists of humorous genre,  for whom  it is the sole Ukrainian publication to publish their works. It is distributed only by subscription, all over the world where Ukrainians live. Subscription fee is the only financial source, no advertisement space is sold.

 

 

Zelda Young, producer/host Shalom, CHIN Radio, for her informative interview program backgrounding the TV miniseries Hitler: The Rise of Evil.

 

As a radio and television personality, Zelda Young, has interviewed world-renowned politicians, journalists, authors, spiritualists and Hollywood stars.

 

Her radio show is the only one of its kind to tap into the pulse of Jewish life.

 

Zelda Young's father, Sam Yuchtman, conceived and produced one of Canada's first Jewish entertainment, radio programs in 1948, the same year as the formation of the State of Israel. At her father's request, Zelda took over the show in 1976.

 

Since then Zelda has dedicated herself to hosting and producing the highly successful radio program now called Zelda, which airs in Toronto, Monday to Friday mornings from 11.00 a.m. to noon, and on Sunday from 8.30 a.m. to 10.00 a.m. in association with CHIN, the largest multicultural radio station in Canada.

 

Sadia Zaman, executive producer Vision TV, for Oratorio, a moving documentary of a Canadian musical tribute to inmates of Terezin concentration camp.

As executive producer, she leads the talented team responsible for two of VisionTV’s signature programs: Credo, an interview series in which prominent Canadians talk about their moral and spiritual convictions; and 360 Vision, an award-winning current affairs show that offers a compass to help guide viewers in their personal faith journeys. 

Previously, Zaman brought her wealth of journalistic experience to the role of Senior Producer for the human affairs program VisionTV Insight.

 

Zaman joined VisionTV in 1991 as field producer and co-host of the series It’s About Time. She later moved to Skylight, the Gemini Award-winning predecessor to VisionTV Insight, as a story editor and segment producer.

 

Zaman began her journalism career at the age of 19, writing for the Wynyard Advance, a small weekly newspaper in central Saskatchewan. A graduate of the School of Journalism and Communications at the University of Regina, she worked as a reporter for CBC Television and Radio in Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia and Toronto, as well as for TVOntario, before coming to VisionTV.

 

Zaman’s work has brought numerous awards and accolades. Her stories for Skylight were twice nominated for Geminis. And in 1998, she was one of four Canadian journalists to be awarded a prestigious Southam Fellowship for Journalists.

 

In addition to her work at VisionTV, Zaman has edited At My Mother’s Feet: Stories of Muslim Women, published in 1999 by Quarry Press for the Canadian Council of Muslim Women.  She is now working on a second book dealing with the same topic.

 

 

Greg Taylor, reporter, APTN National News and Current Affairs for contributing to an understanding of Canada's Métis people with the series Who is Métis?

Greg Taylor, who is Métis, graduated from the University of Winnipeg with a B.A. in Political Sciences and from Red River College with a diploma in Journalism.  Taylor has worked at APTN for four years and has also won a Native Media Award from the Native American Journalist Association in 2002.

 

Suresh Jaura, publisher and managing editor of the e-magazine South Asian Outlook for his article explaining his role in the ethnic media spectrum.

 

Suresh Jaura is a "multifaceted" person - that is how an article in the Who's Who of a local Indo-Canadian weekly referred to him.

Suresh lived in three countries before moving to Canada in 1987. He has travelled around the world to many countries and has taken a deep interest in the media since he was a student at 15 years of age. At the age of 23, he launched a monthly publication, CONFLUX, focussing on the cultural and social life of people in different parts of the world.


Suresh was the founding co-publisher and editor of CanIndia News Weekly. His interest was to reach across to a much larger audience worldwide, by taking advantage of Internet. This is why he launched South Asian Outlook e-Monthly in June 2001.
He is also North American Managing Editor for Global South, an Independent Monthly e-Journal for Global Interdependence.

 

 

Jay Chauhan, columnist South Asian Outlook for his series Window on Canada: Legal Opinion offering his views in question and and answer format.

Jay Chauhan earned degrees from many renowned educational institutions, including a Bachelor of Science from the London School of Economics in England; a Barrister-at-Law at Lincoln's Inn in England; a Master of Economics at the Berlin University in Germany; and a Bachelor of Laws at Osgoode Hall in Ontario, Canada. He was called to the Bar in Ontario in 1972, England in 1965, and admitted as an Advocate in the State of Gujarat, India in 1982. He speaks English, Hindi, Gujarati, and German. 

Jay Chauhan is also a Deputy Judge in the Richmond Hill Court since 1992. He may not hear any cases where he is acting for a client, as that would constitute a conflict of interest.

 

 

Jean La Rose, CEO, Aboriginal People's Television Network, since November 18, 2002 for developing a vital service for Canada's Aboriginal peoples and providing a much-needed source of information and understanding for all Canadians.

 

He is a First Nations citizen from the Abenakis First Nation of Odanak. He was raised in Ottawa where he studied Journalism at “Le Collège Algonquin”. He obtained his B.A. in Social Communications at the University of Ottawa (1978) and a Certificate in Public Relations and Marketing (1980) at “Le Collège Algonquin”. He also started his Masters in Public Administration at “L'École Nationale d'Administration Publique” (ENAP).

He has worked for the federal government primarily in the area of

Communications including the former Department of the Secretary of State, the Treasury Board Secretariat, Health Canada, Foreign Affairs, as well as other departments.

 

Until accepting the position with APTN, Jean LaRose was the Media Relations Officer and Director of Communications for the Assembly of First Nations, a position he occupied for 8 years. He worked for National Chiefs Ovide Mercredi, Phil Fontaine and Matthew Coon Come. Jean LaRose enthusiastically supported the creation of APTN as a member of the original Advisory Board that developed the concept for the first Aboriginal television network in the world. He strongly believes that APTN will become the key institution through which Aboriginal Peoples in Canada will share their stories amongst themselves, with all Canadians, and the rest of the world.

 

 

  Top

 

 
 

www.southasianoutlook.com

Copyright © Globalom Media 2004
Publisher and Managing Editor: Suresh Jaura
Hosted and webdesigned by Globalom Media
A Globalom Media Publication